Anti Bullying Policy

 

 

RAINFORD CHURCH OF ENGLAND

PRIMARY SCHOOL AND RAINDROPS

PRESCHOOL

 

 ‘Learning and growing together to achieve our best in the Love of God’

 

 

Anti-bullying Policy

Including guidelines for dealing with bullying, harassment

and hate crime in school

 

 

 

For approval by Full Governors:   11th July 2017

To be reviewed on or before:      Summer 2020

 

 

Signed……………………………………………  Chair of Governors

 

Signed……………………………………………  Headteacher

 

 

 

 

Our Mission Statement

 

‘Learning and growing together to achieve our best in the Love of God’

 

School Aims

 

In order to prepare today’s children for tomorrow’s challenges, Rainford CE Primary Schools aims to achieve the following:

 

  • Every child will be encouraged to understand the meaning and significance of faith, experience God’s love and develop the spirituality to enable them to live out our Christian values of love, joy, peace, friendship, forgiveness, perseverance and justice

 

  • Every child will achieve their full potential through being a highly motivated, resilient and independent learner who embraces new experiences, has confidence to tackle challenges and go onto develop a lifelong love of learning.

 

  • Every child will value themselves as a unique individual with special qualities and strengths developing self-discipline and honesty; taking responsibility for their own actions and appreciating their ability to make a positive difference in the world.

 

  • Every child will appreciate and respect others, celebrate differences between individuals and groups and respect and care for God’s creation and the environment.

 

  • Every child will be encouraged to make healthy choices and appreciate the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.

In order to do this, we will constantly reflect the Christian ethos of our school in our relationships with our children, their families, our staff, the church and the wider community.

 

 

This policy also applies to Breakfast Club and After School Club.

 

What is bullying?

 

  • Repetitive and persistent. Bullying is usually experienced as part of a continuous pattern and it can be extremely threatening and intimidating even when very subtle. Nevertheless, sometimes a single incident can have precisely the same impact as persistent behaviour over time.
  • Intentionally harmful. The act of bullying intends harm to another individual, although occasionally the distress it causes is not consciously intended by all of those present.
  • Involves an imbalance of power. Bullying leaves someone feeling helpless to prevent it or put a stop to it. In some cases, an imbalance of power may mean that bullying crosses the threshold into abuse. This would require implementation of safeguarding procedures.

 

Why are we against bullying?

 

Every Child Matters’.......because:

  • everyone has the right to feel welcome, secure and happy 
  • we should treat everyone with consideration

 

Bullying of any kind is unacceptable at our school.

 

 

What types of bullying are there?

 

  • Physical bullying

Pushing, kicking, hitting, punching, spitting, hair-pulling or any use of physical violence

Sexual assault

Making people do things they don’t want to

Stopping people doing things they want to

Damaging someone’s belongings

Taking someone else’s belongings e.g. mobile phones or money. The threat of violence can accompany theft and there can be clear instances of extortion focused on weaker students.

  • Verbal bullying

Name-calling; the range of possible unpleasant language is wide and usually focuses on someone’s appearance, personal hygiene, family or ability

Sarcasm, teasing, mocking, ‘put-downs’

Spreading rumours

Saying or writing nasty things

Blackmail and threats

Making offensive remarks, including comments about someone’s gender, race, disability, religion or sexual orientation; this bullying is discriminatory and may be unlawful.

  • Indirect bullying

Being unfriendly, not talking to someone

Excluding from social groups and activities

Tormenting (e.g. hiding books), making someone feel uncomfortable or scared

Using threatening gestures, looks and signs/symbols

  • Cyberbullying

Misuse of areas of the internet, such as email and internet chat room

Mobile phone threats by text messaging and calls

Misuse of technology, e.g. camera and video facilities used to record ‘happy slapping’

 

What are the signs and symptoms of bullying?

 

A person may indicate by signs or behaviours that they are being bullied. Everyone should be aware of these possible signs and should investigate if the person:

  • Is frightened of walking to or from school
  • Doesn’t want to go on the school/public bus
  • Begs to be driven to school
  • Changes their usual routine
  • Is unwilling to go to school (school phobic)
  • Begins to truant
  • Becomes withdrawn, anxious or lacking in confidence
  • Starts stammering
  • Attempts or threatens suicide or runs away
  • Cries themselves to sleep at night or has nightmares
  • Feels ill in the morning
  • Begins to do poorly in school work
  • Comes home with clothes torn or books damaged
  • Has possessions that are damaged or ‘go missing’
  • Asks for money or starts stealing money (to pay bully)
  • Has dinner or other monies continually ‘lost’
  • Has unexplained cuts or bruises
  • Comes home ‘starving’ (money/lunch has been stolen)
  • Becomes aggressive, disruptive or unreasonable
  • Is bullying other children or siblings
  • Stops eating
  • Is frightened to say what is wrong
  • Gives improbable excuses for any of the above
  • Is afraid to use the internet or mobile phone
  • Is nervous and jumpy when a cyber message is received

 

What causes Bullying? (Discussed with children during workshop)

 

People bully for different reasons. The reasons could be:

 

  • to feel powerful
  • jealousy
  • to feel good about themselves
  • to be in control
  • because they want something (attention, possession or friends)
  • to look good in front of other people
  • to feel popular
  • because of peer pressure
  • to be big/clever
  • for fun
  • because they are being bullied themselves
  • because they see and pick on an easy target (small, won’t tell anyone, lonely or different in some way)
  • a child is seen as different in some way e.g. clever, not clever, weak
  • children have fallen out
  • a child becomes angry as a result of e.g. name calling
  • because they think they are the better person

 

 

How can we prevent Bullying?

 

At Rainford CE we foster a clear understanding that bullying, in any form, is not acceptable. We are proactive in our approach to preventing bullying by:

 

  • Regular praise of positive and supportive behaviour by all staff using verbal praise, stickers and through team and class points system
  • Use of SEAL in assemblies and during lessons to develop empathy and emotional intelligence
  • Anti-bullying focused week
  • Any incidents treated seriously and dealt with immediately
  • Encourage openness stress that it is not wrong to speak out – TELL
  • Allay fears of retaliation
  • Give both sides the opportunity to say their side of the story, on their own and together
  • Use P.S.H.E. lessons, circle time and assemblies to encourage good behaviour
  • Speaking to parents
  • Awareness of repeated incidents
  • Encourage parents to report incidents immediately
  • Trained playground squad, friendship stop
  • If necessary change the organisation of the class
  • Worry Box for children to use to express anxieties or concerns

 

 

Why is it important to respond to Bullying?

 

Bullying Hurts!

Everybody has the right to be treated with respect.

Everybody has the right to feel happy and safe.

No-one deserves to be a victim of bullying.

Bullies need to learn different ways of behaving.

 

At Rainford CE we will strive to ensure all pupils understand the difference between bullying and getting on and falling out.

 

Responses to Bullying

 

Our school will respond promptly and effectively to reported incidents of bullying

When an incident has been reported involvement can include the following; the child or children involved, the whole class, the class teacher, the Headteacher, the parents.  Involvement may include all of these or a combination of whatever is felt appropriate using strategies from our list of actions/responses.

 

An incident file is available in school accessible to all staff. It is located in the Headteacher’s office.  All incidents of bullying are reported to the Headteacher and recorded with dates and outcomes. The Headteacher reports all bullying incidents to the Full Governing Body through the Headteacher’s Termly Report.

 

 

This policy should be read in conjunction with the school’s other safeguarding policies including the following:

          Child Protection Policy

          Code of Conduct

          Whistle Blowing Policy

          Anti-bullying Policy

          Procedure for managing allegations against people who work with children and

           young people

          Health and Safety Policy/ Health Care Plans

          Medicine policy

          Risk Assessments

          Managing Allegations against Pupils Policy (2016)

          Policy for Preventing Radicalisation and Extremism

          Behaviour Policy

          Positive Handling Policy

          Child Sexual Exploitation (LSCB)

          Mobile Phone Policy

          Social Media Policy

          E Safety and Acceptable Use Policy

          Anti Harassment and Anti Bullying & Hate Crime policy (part of Behaviour Policy)

          Attendance Policy

          Recruitment and Selection,

          Guidance for Safe Working Practice for Adults who work with Children and Young People

          Summary handbook-what to do if you think a child is being abused

 

A copy of St Helens Local Authority Guidance is attached as an appendix with the forms for incidents of bullying, hate and harassment included.

 

Support Agencies

Anti-bullying Alliance – a unique collection of over 60 organisations, working together to stop bullying.  ABA runs an ‘antibullying week’ focusing on schools in mid November each year.        www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk

 

Beatbullying includes ‘CyberMentors and ‘MiniMentors’. Beatbullying works with children and young people across the UK to provide them with all important opportunities to make positive and lasting changes to their lives and outlook.

http://beatbullyingalliance.org.uk

Kidscape advice for parents 0845 1205 204                                                                                       www.kidscape.org.uk

Childline – advice and stories from children who have survived bullying 0800 1111 http://www.childline.org.uk

 

NSPCC

http://www.nspcc.org.uk

 

Bullying on line a website aimed at adults working with children under 11 years and for the children themselves

http://www.bullying.co.uk

 

Think U Know - the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), has produced a set of resources around internet safety

www.thinkuknow.co.uk  

 

Stonewall a lesbian, gay and bi-sexual with free resources available for dealing with homophobic bullying

http://stonewall.org.uk

 

UKCCIS – UK Council for Child Internet Safety over 140 organisations and individuals working together to help children and young people stay safe on the internet

http://www.clickcleverclicksafe.com

 

Childnet International work in partnership with others around the world to make the Internet a great and safe place for children

http://www.childnet-int.org

 

Anti-Bullying Network

http://www.antibullying.net

 

Talk, Don’t Walk a service for young people who may run away. A local, specialist service offering a range of information and advice, emotional and outreach support services, family medication and innovative training and resources to support everyone to develop healthier relaionships

http://www.therelationshipscentre.co.uk/talkdontwalk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROCEDURES AT RAINFORD CE FOR REPORTING BULLYING:

PATHWAYS OF HELP

 

Step 1b

Student/Parent approaches:

Friend

Class Teacher

Other Teacher

Non Teaching trusted member of the school community

Support Staff

 

Child is bullied

 

Step 2

Student /Parent meet with class teacher

Discussion on the facts

Suggested ways forward including discussion with alleged perpetrator

Set a short date to review situation

 

       
 

Step 1a

Self referral by student using a ‘worry box’ or incident card

 
     

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 3

Inform Headteacher

Discussion/Interview with all parties

Will use: suggested and agreed actions/strategies such as

 restorative justice

Parents informed

Incident/s recorded

Governors informed

Short term review

Situation monitored

If continues or incident/s need addressing quickly

 

                                   

 

 

Step 4

Senior member of staff organise referral

  • Mediation/counselling
  • Anger management training & self help
  • Peer Mentor/Buddy support
  • External Agencies – Connexions
  • Circle of friends
     If continues

 

 

 

 

Step 5

Headteacher informs Chair of Governors and seek advice and support from LA Inclusion Service

If continues

Guidelines for dealing with Bullying, Harassment & Hate Crime in Schools

2010

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contents

 

 
 

4

 

5-6

 

6

 

6-7

 

7

 

8

 

8-9

 

9

 

9

 

9-10

 

10

 

10

 

10

 

11

 

11

 

11-12

 

12

 

12

 

12-13

 

14

 

15

 

15-16

 

16

 

16-17

 

18

 

18

 

 

 

Foreword                                                                                                  4

 

Introduction and Aims of the Guidelines

 

Why is it important to respond to bullying?

 

What is Bullying?

 

Methods of Bullying

 

Signs and Symptoms of Bullying

 

Vulnerable Groups

 

Reasons why children and young people don’t report bullying

 

Factors that may encourage children and young people to bully

 

Factors that may make a child or young person more likely to be bullied

 

Giving children and young people the confidence to tell

 

The behaviour of bystanders

 

E-Safety

 

Strategies to Reduce Bullying

 

Responding to Bullying

 

How to tackle issues with people involved in bullying

 

Working with Parents and Carers

 

Menu of Support

 

‘Safe to Learn’ – Embedding Anti-Bullying Work in Schools (DFE)

 

Safeguarding

 

Role and Responsibility of Children and Young People’s Services

 

Role and Responsibility of The School

 

Role and Responsibility of The Governing Body

 

Support for those who experience bullying

 

Objectives and Policy development

 

Monitoring the Policy

 

 
 

 

18

 

19

 

 

20-21

 

22

 

23

 

24

 

25-27

 

28

 

29

 

30

 

31

 

32-35

 

36-37

 

38-40

 

41

 

Review/Evaluation

 

Dealing with complaints from parents

 

 

Appendix 1 – Recording and Monitoring Incidents

 

Appendix 2 – Form A - Request for Support

 

Appendix 3 – Form B - Victim Reporting Form

 

Appendix 4 – Form C - Witness Reporting Form

 

Appendix 5 – Form D - School Incident Recording Form

 

Appendix 6 – Form E - LA Incident Recording Form                                       25

 

Appendix 7 – Form F - Review Sheet

 

Appendix 8 – Form G - Tell us what you think (Child/Young Person Form)

 

Appendix 9 – Form H - Tell us what you think (Parent/Carer Form)

 

Appendix 10 – The Legal Context

 

Appendix 11 – Useful Contacts

 

Appendix 12 – Policy Framework

 

Appendix 13 – Hate Crime Reporting Form

 

 

 

Foreword

 

St. Helens Council recognises that discrimination and bullying of any kind has no place in society. Children & Young People’s Services recognises that this can exist in schools and throughout the wider community with which students come into contact. We are committed to addressing bullying within our schools and communities by providing a secure and caring learning environment for all members of our school communities, enabling students to thrive and succeed. All staff, governing bodies and the Council are committed to the fight against racism, ageism, homophobia, sexist and disability-based bullying.

 

Schools, governing bodies and the Council have an important responsibility to promote equality of opportunity to all people who are part of our society, no matter what age, gender, race, sexual orientation or disability. 

 

We want the children and young people in St. Helens to grow up safe and healthy, enjoying their childhood, achieving as young people and succeeding as adults, in a community which values and respects them, and supports them as they seek to achieve their aspirations and deliver the promise of their youth.

 

 

 

Susan Richardson

Director of Children & Young People’s Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduction

 

Children, young people and parents say bullying is among their top concerns. Bullying can make the lives of victims a misery; it can undermine their confidence and self-esteem, often destroying their sense of security, which can have a lifelong negative impact.

 

Bullying does not happen only in schools. It can happen anywhere. Children who are badly bullied in school are more likely than others to be bullied both in and out of school. To tackle bullying successfully, the whole community and all services for children and young people need to work together to change the culture so that bullying is unacceptable.

 

We aim to:

  • Raise the profile of bullying and its effects on children and young people’s emotional health and wellbeing, life chances and achievement.
  • Support a culture in which bullying is not acceptable, by promoting policies and practices which prevent or reduce opportunities for bullying and deal swiftly, fairly and sensitively with any incidents which occur.
  • Promote a consistent approach to bullying for all members of a school.
  • Ensure that all those who work with and support children have the skills and knowledge to address bullying effectively.
  • Work collaboratively with all practitioners involved with children and young people in promoting positive outcomes for children and young people.

 

This policy is built upon and follows ideas contained within Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) Safe to Learn guidance:

 

  • Embedding anti-bullying work in schools.
  • Guidance for local authorities and other strategic leaders on reducing bullying in the community.
  • Cyberbullying.
  • Involving children with special educational needs and disabilities.
  • Training resources.
  • Safe from bullying
    • In youth activities
    • In play, leisure and learning provision
    • In further education colleges
    • In children’s homes
    • In extended services in and around schools
    • On journeys

 

All of the above documents can be found in full on the Department for Education website or on the St. Helens Safeguarding Children Board website.

 

The Equality Act 2010 aims to simplify, streamline and strengthen existing equality law. It will give individuals greater protection from unfair discrimination. Part 6 of the Act covers schools and education providers.

 

For schools, one of the main changes within the Act is the duty to record and report not only racist bullying, but also all identity-based forms of bullying. The current guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission states:

 

“As a school, you have legal duties to your pupils in relation to bullying and you must ensure that you treat all bullying on the grounds of a protected characteristic with the same level of seriousness as any other form of bullying.”

 

 

 

Aims of the Guidelines

 

These guidelines aim to:

  • Advise and support Governors, Head teachers, staff, parents/carers, children and young people in the development, implementation, monitoring and reviewing of anti-bullying policies and practice.
  • Inform Governors, Head teachers, and staff about their current legal responsibilities.
  • Build on the good practice that is present in schools.

 

Throughout this guidance, ‘staff’ refers to all adults within a school who have responsibilities for the children and young people: teachers, teaching assistants, midday supervisors, etc.

 

Schools must have anti-bullying practices and procedures and local authorities must ensure that schools comply with their duties.

 

This guidance should be used in conjunction with other documentation relating to safeguarding children and young people.

 

Why is it important to respond to bullying?

 

Bullying hurts! No one deserves to be a victim of bullying. Everyone has the right to be treated with respect. Children, young people and adults who are bullying need to learn different ways of behaving.

 

Everyone has a responsibility to respond promptly and effectively to issues of bullying.

 

What is Bullying?

 

There are many definitions of bullying, but most consider bullying to be:

“Deliberately hurtful behaviour repeated over a period of time and in circumstances where it is difficult for those being bullied to defend themselves.”

This definition was recognised and accepted in case law (Hansen v. Isle of White Council).

 

The Government defines bullying as:

Behaviour by an individual or group, usually repeated over time, that intentionally hurts another individual or group physically or emotionally.”

(DCSF 2007)

 

Bullying is, therefore:

  • Repetitive and persistent. Bullying is usually experienced as part of a continuous pattern and it can be extremely threatening and intimidating even when very subtle. Nevertheless, sometimes a single incident can have precisely the same impact as persistent behaviour over time.
  • Intentionally harmful. The act of bullying intends harm to another individual, although occasionally the distress it causes is not consciously intended by all of those who are present.
  • Involves an imbalance of power. Bullying leaves someone feeling helpless to prevent it or put a stop to it. In some cases, an imbalance of power may mean that bullying crosses the threshold into abuse. This would require implementation of safeguarding procedures.

 

Due to the nature of bullying, it may also be classed as a Hate Crime.

 

Hate Crime can be defined as:

Behaviour that a victim or any other person thinks was caused by hatred of age, disability, gender identity, race, religion or sexual orientation.

 

A victim of Hate Crime does not have to be a member of a minority or someone who is generally considered to be vulnerable. For example, a person who is the friend of someone from a different ethnic group, a different sexual orientation or a disabled person may be targeted because of their association.

 

Hate Crime can be actual or perceived and can include:

  • Verbal abuse, threats, insults, nuisance telephone calls, name-calling.
  • Physical assaults and violence, anything from pushing to serious attack.
  • Property damage - graffiti, vandalism, theft, damage to vehicles, arson.
  • Publishing and circulating materials such as leaflets that may incite Hate Crime.
  • Hate Crime attacks can be a combination of the above. For example, bullying at school or within the workplace may consist of name-calling and physical abuse.
  • Any form of Hate Crime should be reported to the police (in an emergency situation, call 999 or complete an online form at https://www.merseyside.police.uk/index.aspx?articleid=2814) or, if preferred, reports can be made via St. Helens Council (by contacting 01744 676789 or using the St. Helens Council Hate Crime reporting form (online at http://www.sthelens.gov.uk/openfile.htm?id=1793)

 

Methods of Bullying

 

Good anti-bullying policies and training for all staff should detail the different forms of bullying that children and young people may experience, as understanding the nature of bullying is the starting point for effective detection and response.

 

Bullying can take various forms and includes the following types of behaviour:

 

Physical bullying

Verbal bullying

Indirect bullying

Cyberbullying

Pushing, kicking, hitting, punching, spitting, hair-pulling or any use of physical violence

Name-calling; the range of possible unpleasant language is wide and usually focuses on someone’s appearance, personal hygiene, family or ability

Being unfriendly, not talking to someone

Misuse of areas of the internet, such as email & internet chat room

Sexual assault

Sarcasm, teasing, mocking, “put-downs”

 

Excluding from social groups and activities

Mobile phone threats by text messaging and calls

Making people do things they don’t want to do

Spreading rumours

Tormenting (e.g. hiding books), making someone feel uncomfortable or scared

Misuse of technology, e.g. camera & video facilities used to record “happy slapping”

Stopping people doing things they want to do

Saying or writing nasty things

Using threatening gestures, looks and signs/symbols

 

Damaging someone’s belongings

Blackmail and threats

 

 

Taking someone else’s belongings, e.g. mobile phones or money. The threat of violence can accompany theft and there can be clear instances of extortion focused on weaker students.

 

Making offensive remarks, including comments about someone’s gender, race, disability, religion or sexual orientation. This bullying is discriminatory and may be unlawful.

 

 

 

Signs and Symptoms of Bullying

 

A child/young person may indicate by signs or behaviour that he or she is being bullied. Adults should be aware of these possible signs and they should investigate if a child:

 

  • Is frightened of walking to or from school.
  • Doesn’t want to go on the school/public bus.
  • Begs to be driven to school.
  • Changes their usual routine.
  • Is unwilling to go to school (school-phobic).
  • Begins to truant.
  • Becomes withdrawn, anxious, or lacking in confidence.
  • Starts stammering.
  • Attempts or threatens suicide or runs away.
  • Cries themselves to sleep at night or has nightmares.
  • Feels ill in the morning.
  • Begins to do poorly in schoolwork.
  • Comes home with clothes torn or books damaged.
  • Has possessions that are damaged or “go missing”.
  • Asks for money or starts stealing money (to pay bully).
  • Has dinner or other monies continually “lost”.
  • Has unexplained cuts or bruises.
  • Comes home starving (money/lunch has been stolen).
  • Becomes aggressive, disruptive or unreasonable.
  • Is bullying other children or siblings.
  • Stops eating.
  • Is frightened to say what’s wrong.
  • Gives improbable excuses for any of the above.
  • Is afraid to use the internet or mobile phone.
  • Is nervous and jumpy when a cyber message is received.

 

These signs and behaviours could indicate other problems, but bullying should be considered a possibility and should be investigated.

 

Transition can precipitate problems, which, without early intervention, can lead to disaffection or vulnerability. For example, transition between:

  • Home and infant school.
  • Infant and junior school.
  • Primary and secondary school.
  • Home and school after a long absence, for example, due to illness or living abroad.
  • Returning to school after a period of exclusion.
  • Those entering school outside the normal year of entry, especially those who have attended a large number of schools or who may not yet be able to speak English, may also experience heightened levels of bullying.

 

Vulnerable Groups

 

Identifying children who are likely to be vulnerable to bullying is problematic. At both policy and practical level, there should be a clear message that no one ever deserves to be bullied, it is not the victim’s fault.

 

There are certain groups of children and young people who are generally considered more vulnerable to being bullied because of changes, difficulties and uncertainties in their lives and because of the stereotypical thinking of the adults and peers around them. Staff need to be aware of who these children are and to consider their specific needs. These groups could include:

 

  • Looked after children.
  • Traveller children.
  • Children with disabilities.
    • Physical
    • Learning Difficulties
    • Special Educational Needs
  • Gifted and talented children.
  • Young carers.
  • Children subject to racism.
  • Children subject to homophobia.
  • Children subject to sexist or sexual bullying.

 

Reasons why children and young people don’t report bullying

 

  • They believe parents, teachers or leaders cannot do anything about it.
  • They believe parents don’t understand about school life.
  • Peers expect you to stand up for yourself and to be able to cope.
  • Telling adults only makes it harder.
  • They feel ashamed of being unpopular.
  • They feel they must deserve it.
  • They are too frightened to tell.
  • They just have to put up with it, as it is part of life.

 

Factors that may encourage children and young people to bully

 

It may be useful for staff to consider what factors may predispose young people to become bullies. Bullying behaviour amongst children and young people can be a result of individual characteristics, home experiences and school life.

 

  • Home
    • Little social status available – little verbal interaction, high physical/verbal aggressions
  • Individual
    • Charismatic and/or dominant within the peer group
    • Limited interpersonal skills
    • Likely to have been a victim of bullying in the past
    • May have a high degree of stress in their own lives
  • School
    • No effective ‘Whole School’ approach to self-review
    • No clear rules/boundaries/interventions
    • No policy re: unacceptability
    • Models of teachers/other adults bullying – covert support
    • Opportunities to bully – breaks, lunch, waiting for a teacher or supervisor, in a changing room
    • Geography of the building – hidden corners, unsupervised areas
    • Poor communication with parents

 

Factors that may make a child or young person more likely to be bullied

Likewise, the following characteristics have been shown to be of significance in relation to children who are victims of bullying.

 

  • Home
    • Possibly overprotective – not allowing independence – non-assertive models
    • Lack of awareness about growing up
    • Lack of “street cred” – appearance/social life that is ‘different’
    • Too frightened to tell, scared of repercussions/escalation
  • Individual
    • Minor disabilities
    • Clumsiness
    • Physical features/colour of skin/colour of hair/dress/speech/height/weight
    • Unassertiveness
    • Sensitivity – highly sensitive or apparently insensitive
    • Few friends, difficulty in forming relationships
    • Low self-esteem – few attributes esteemed by peer group
  • School
  • No acknowledgement of difficulty
  • Little or no security
  • No policy – weak pastoral system, nature of school culture
  • No communication with parents

 

Giving children and young people the confidence to tell

 

It is imperative that children and young people have the confidence to tell adults about bullying behaviours that they witness or experience, if bullying is to decrease. Very early on, even in nursery, children can learn that telling an adult that they are being teased/bullied may rebound on them and this may lead them to feel vulnerable.

Schools and other settings need to encourage young people to report bullying cases and to have effective support mechanisms in place for this to happen.

 

Establishing that trust can be made easier by:

  • Listening to young people.
  • Consulting with young people.
  • Publicising procedures for dealing with bullying.
  • Responding to all incidents of bullying in a consistent manner.

 

Research shows that young people who feel they could exercise some control over their situation felt more competent and effective.

 

 

The behaviour of bystanders

 

Young people may fail to help someone who is being bullied for a variety of

reasons. Research suggests that this is not apathy, rather a feeling of not knowing what to do as well as having fears that they, themselves, will be teased or bullied. Children and young people may also be apprehensive that they will not receive the support of peers and teachers. Schools and other settings would benefit by making explicit, the vital role of bystanders in helping to eliminate bullying.

 

E-Safety

 

Cyberbullying is a form of bullying and, as such, schools should be equipped to deal with cases through existing anti-bullying and behaviour polices and procedures. However, schools should recognise the ways in which cyberbullying differs from other forms of bullying, in terms of the size of the audience and location in which it occurs. Cyberbullying will have an impact on the education, health and wellbeing of the person being bullied. Schools have broad powers to discipline and regulate the behaviour of pupils, even when they are off the school site – these are set out in the Education and Inspections Act 2006.

 

However, it is important to recognise that technology is integral to the lives of young people and that education and discussion around responsible use and e-safety is key to helping them deal confidently with any problems that arise, whether in or out of school.

 

Further information and guidance in relation to e-safety can be located at www.sthelenslscb.org.uk

 

Strategies to Reduce Bullying

 

There are many strategies that can be adopted by schools to reduce all types of bullying. Broadly, these strategies can be defined as:

  • Preventive Strategies – these aim to prevent and/or minimise bullying.
  • Intervention Strategies – these aim to minimise the effects of bullying.
  • Reactive Strategies – these are in response to a disclosure of bullying.

 

All of these strategies can be used within/for the whole school, groups or individuals.

 

The importance of a consistent whole school approach for minimising bullying behaviours cannot be emphasised too greatly. All adult members of a school should:

  • Recognise that bullying exists within their organisation.
  • Accept responsibility for the reduction of bullying.
  • Share a common language to describe bullying behaviours.

 

This acceptance of responsibility, in turn, implies that all adults should not only be in agreement as to what constitutes acceptable behaviour between people, but also provide positive role models for children and young people. This understanding should underpin policies and practices at all levels.

 

Responding to Bullying

 

Working with bullies requires time and skills. It is important to remember that:

  • Bullies can be from any background or ability group.
  • National surveys indicate that half the children and young people who bully had been bullied themselves.
  • Male bullies are twice as likely to be in trouble with the police than their peers.
  • Bullies can have distress in their own lives and use fighting and threatening behaviour as a way of coping.
  • Some are heavily influenced by sub-cultures where bullying and abuse are the norm.
  • Some carry family feuds into schools, and parents encourage their bullying as normal behaviour.

 

Anyone who bullies should be made aware of the effect of their actions. It should be made clear to them that they are bullying, that their behaviour is unacceptable and that it will not be tolerated. It should also be recognised, however, that often, young people who bully need help and support and that there is a duty to ensure they receive it. Understanding why they have engaged in bullying behaviour and knowing how to respond differently, in similar situations, will reduce the risk of repeated behaviour.

 

How to tackle issues with people involved in bullying

 

Supporting the Victim

Dealing with the Bully

A staff member taking time to talk with the child in a safe environment in which the child feels comfortable

A staff member talking to the child about their behaviour and the possible reasons for it

Encouraging the child to discuss their preferences for how the issue is addressed

Referring the child for support or therapeutic intervention from relevant agencies

Discussing strategies for how the child may deal with the current and any future incidents

Restorative Justice, where the bully will have to face up to their behaviour and consider alternative ways of behaving in the resolution of conflict

Gaining access to older students trained as a peer mentor, to whom the victim may turn for help, or a ‘circle of friends’

Discussing strategies for how the child manages their feelings of anger and frustration

Providing a safe play area or quiet room for younger students or those who feel threatened at break times

Providing a safe method of releasing stress or frustration

Referring the child for support or therapeutic intervention from relevant agencies

Actively monitoring the child to assess whether the bullying has stopped and initiating further action if required

Actively monitoring the child to assess whether the bullying has stopped and initiating further action if required

Serious incidents of bullying may require the removal of the bully from the class; withdrawal of privileges or participation in activities; detention; fixed period exclusion

 

Involvement of the police, where the bullying constitutes a crime

 

It is believed that up to 12 children per year commit suicide as a result of bullying. Should anyone talk about or threaten suicide, professional help must be sought immediately.

 

Working with Parents and Carers

 

Effective liaison with parents is vital to tackle bullying successfully. Schools need to involve parents/carers at an early stage in order to explain the situation fully, and parents should be informed of any incident within 24 hours of it being reported to the school. Parental concerns must be taken seriously. Failure to do so can result in a formal complaint to the governing body or the local authority. Parents of a victim of bullying will want action taken. They need to be fully included in the process to prevent a serious breakdown of confidence between them and the school. Support may need to be provided for the parent/carer in working with the school over bullying issues, as some parents may themselves feel intimidated by attending meetings in school or may feel worried about the consequences for their child.

 

Parents of children who are alleged bullies often find it hard to accept the image of their child presented by the school and deny that their child is capable of such behaviour. It is therefore important that discussions are based on well-documented evidence. Schools are able to use parenting contracts as an early intervention strategy to ensure parents tackle problem behaviour before a child/young person reaches the point of being excluded from school.

 

Menu of Support

 

The Local Authority and partners offer a range of intervention strategies for pupils and parents. In addition, professional development opportunities for staff and governors can also be accessed in relation to developing good practice and robust policy within this area. 

 

Safe to Learn – Embedding Anti-Bullying Work in Schools (DFE)

 

This document provides excellent guidance for schools on how to create and implement whole school anti-bullying policy that is in accordance with the principles set out in ‘Bullying: a Charter for Action’ and which is set within a School Improvement Plan.

 

The Anti-Bullying Charter principles mean –

 

For students who experience bullying, that:

  • they are heard;
  • they know how to report bullying and get help;
  • they are confident in the school’s ability to deal with the bullying;
  • steps are taken to help them feel safe again;
  • they are helped to rebuild confidence and resilience;
  • they know how they can get support from others.

 

 

 

For students who engage in bullying behaviour:

  • sanctions and learning programmes hold them to account for their behaviour and help them to face up to the harm they have caused;
  • they learn to behave in ways which do not cause harm in future, because they have developed their emotional skills and knowledge;
  • they learn how they can take steps to repair the harm they have caused.

 

For schools:

  • the whole school community is clear about the anti-bullying stance the school takes;
  • students, as well as staff and other members of the school, are fully engaged in developing and reviewing anti-bullying work in the school;
  • every chance is taken to celebrate the success of anti-bullying work;
  • all students are clear about the roles they can take in preventing bullying, including the role of bystanders.

 

For heads, governors and other school staff:

  • they develop whole school policies which meet the law and school inspection requirements;
  • they promote a school climate where bullying and violence are not tolerated and cannot flourish;
  • there is a review of the school anti-bullying policy every two years and, as a result, the policy and procedures are updated as necessary;
  • curriculum opportunities are used to address bullying;
  • pupil support systems are in place to prevent and respond to bullying;
  • they have addressed school site issues and promote safe play areas;
  • all staff take part in relevant professional development and are clear about their roles and responsibilities in preventing and responding to bullying;
  • all staff are aware of the importance of modelling positive relationships;
  • data systems gather useful information about the effectiveness of the anti-bullying work and this data is used for monitoring and evaluation and is shared with the school community;
  • they work in partnership with parents, other schools and with Children’s Services and community partners to promote safe communities.

 

For parents:

  • they are clear that the school does not tolerate bullying;
  • they are aware of procedures to use if they are concerned their child is being bullied or does not feel safe to learn, including the school’s complaints procedure;
  • they have confidence that the school will take any complaint about bullying seriously and investigate/resolve as necessary and that the school systems will deal with the bullying in a way which protects their child;
  • they are clear about ways in which they can complement the school on the anti-bullying policy or procedures.

The document also covers the headings listed below:

 

Identify anti-bullying as a school improvement issue.

  • Auditing - Who should do what?
  • Consultation and planning.
  • What an anti-bullying policy should contain.
  • Where the anti-bullying policy should sit in relation to other school policies.
  • Engaging students in the development of the policy.
  • Communication of the policy.
  • Monitoring the progress made.
  • Evaluating the policy.
  • Celebrating success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safeguarding

 

The diagram below highlights for everyone the various components which form a picture of what safeguarding is.

           
   
 
     
 
 

Safeguarding is everyone’s business, everywhere, all the time.

Safe Recruitment & Selection

 

 

Child Protection
Anti-bullying Policy

 

 

Staff conduct

 

 

 

 

 

Positive handling

 

 

 

 

 

 

Curriculum

 

 

Attendance

 

 

 

Managing allegations against staff

 

 

 

 

Safeguarding

 

 

Behaviour Management

 

 

 

Building design

 

 

Health & Safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whistleblowing

 

 

 

Children in Entertainment & Employment Licensing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Role and Responsibility of Children and Young People’s Services

In order to fulfil its responsibilities, Children & Young People’s Services (CYPS) will:

  • Publicise this document widely to ensure that its content is made known to all schools, governing bodies, children’s settings and other sections within CYPS;
  • Ensure that a range of training is provided for staff and governors so that they become fully aware and sensitive to incidents of bullying and appropriate methods for dealing with them;
  • Provide schools and children’s settings with information, guidance and support on anti-bullying policies and initiatives;
  • Ensure that schools develop and implement a whole school anti-bullying policy;
  • Disseminate good practice;
  • Oversee the monitoring of incidents of bullying and harassment in schools and settings for children;
  • Assist schools to reduce truancy due to bullying;
  • Report annually to the Safeguarding Children Board about bullying.

 

Schools will be supported by:

  • Behaviour Support
  • Healthy Schools
  • Educational Psychology Service
  • Education Welfare Service
  • PSHE Advisory Teacher
  • Keeping Children Safe Team
  • Children’s Social Care
  • Education Support for Looked After Children

 

Through partnership arrangements, schools and children’s settings will also be supported by:

• Voluntary Sector agencies

• Youth Offending Team

• Youth Service

• CAMHS

• Police, including Safer Schools Officers

 

Bullying incidents reported directly to CYPS

 

CYPS has a responsibility to ensure that the School’s Governing Body responds to any allegations of bullying.

 

If a concern related to bullying is received directly by CYPS, it will be acted on in the first instance by the concern being referred back to the school for investigation. Should the concern be upheld, it will be logged within CYPS and referred to the School’s Governing Body.

 

Role and Responsibility of the School

 

  • Demonstrate a visible commitment to dealing with bullying and adopt a whole school approach with strong leadership and a range of preventative measures including building emotional resilience, empathy and self-esteem, as well as having clear procedures for identifying and managing bullying.
  • Base anti-bullying strategies on clear, current knowledge of the local issues within the school. The Anti-bullying Alliance describes the need to investigate where, when and how bullying occurs and whether any peer groups are particularly responsible. This should include an annual survey of children.
  • Recognise the distinction between bullying and other types of conflict and aggressive behaviours.
  • Ensure the active involvement of children and young people, their families and community partners in developing and implementing strategies and in promoting a culture of respect and valuing diversity.
  • Identify vulnerable children and young people, and those critical moments and transitions when they may become vulnerable, and provide additional support when needed.
  • Support the ongoing development of empathy, emotional resilience and a sense of responsibility for behaviour from early years to adulthood and beyond.
  • Apply clear and consistent Rewards and Sanctions Policies that are understood by all members of the school community and are suitable for the age, maturity and understanding of the child or young person.
  • Ensure all members of staff are trained, supported and model positive relationships.

 

Examples of specific strategies:

 

  • The Curriculum addresses the issues of bullying through programmes of intervention within the school and at classroom level provided in:
    • Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE)
    • Behaviour and Attendance National Strategies
  • Cross-curricular approaches and strands.
  • Counselling Services.
  • Peer counselling, mentoring, playground buddying and befriending schemes.
  • Group courses on self-esteem and anger management.
  • Emotional Literacy strategies, such as Circle Time and Circle of Friends.
  • Support in identifying and changing the behaviours for those who bully.
  • Drama and role-play.
  • Mediation.
  • Advocacy.
  • Restorative Justice.

 

The quality and effectiveness of any preventive, intervention and reactive strategy depends on:

  • Good communication.
  • Flexibility of response, particularly timing.
  • The ability to meet the identified needs of the members of the school/children’s setting/ community.
  • Responsiveness of the strategy to evaluation.

 

Any strategies should be sensitive to the severity and persistency of the negative interactions. Bullying is part of a continuum of negative behaviours within relationships that extend from day-to-day disagreements occurring within the majority of relationships, through to extreme forms of bullying involving violence and death.

 

Role and Responsibility of The Governing Body

 

  • Promote the safeguarding and wellbeing of pupils in their school.
  • Monitor and evaluate the policy to ensure that statutory and non-statutory aspects are appropriately reflected.
  • Ensure that the Head teacher determines measures to promote good behaviour.

 

Support for those who experience bullying

 

Support is available from a wide range of trained professionals.

 

Schools and other educational or recreational settings where young people engage with each other and adults, have a responsibility to develop an ethos where everyone is:

  • Able to feel safe from intimidation, threat or harm.
  • Valued for their personal worth.
  • Treated with respect and kindness and encouraged to develop an empathy with others.
  • Able to teach, learn and offer and receive support.
  • Aware of their responsibilities to be concerned for the welfare and safety of others.
  • Friendly, courteous and co-operative and treats property with respect.

 

In 2003, Ofsted published a paper, ‘Bullying: Effective Action in Secondary Schools’. This paper set out a number of features that would show good anti-bullying practices within schools.

 

Organisation

A strong ethos in the school which promotes tolerance and respect, including respect for difference and diversity

Positive leadership from senior staff and governors on how bullying is to be dealt with within the overall policy on attitudes and behaviour

A clear policy statement about bullying which has been drawn up in collaboration with staff, governors, parents, students and volunteers and which includes examples of how instances of bullying will be handled

Clear incident reporting systems with a range of access points for children and young people to report bullying, including text messaging and confidential website reporting

A planned approach in curriculum and tutorial programmes to the issue of bullying, including the risks of new communications technologies, in a context which promotes self-esteem and confident relationships, with strong links to curriculum initiatives, such as PSHE, National Primary and Secondary Strategies

Provision of counselling services and the providing of individual and small group support to address issues such as self-esteem and anger management

Regular training for all staff to raise and maintain awareness, to alert them to indicators which may suggest bullying, and to equip them with ways of responding to it

Preventive Approaches

Create an ethos in schools and establishments where tolerance and respect is promoted and valued. Establish that any kind of harassment is not tolerated

Staff model anti bullying practice through their own interpersonal relationships, body language, verbal and non-verbal communication

Preventative, proactive interventions, such as Restorative Justice, that develop positive interactions within all relationships within school and enable the developing of alternative ways of behaving in the prevention and resolution of conflict

Periodic consultation with students to find out what bullying occurs, when, where and by whom

Involving children and young people in the development and monitoring of anti-bullying practice through school councils and other representative forums

Confidential and varied means for alerting the school to current instances of bullying

Schools identify areas where there is a higher risk of bullying, e.g. corners or corridors where there is no surveillance, toilets, school transport, playgrounds, and instigate preventative measures

Efficient patrolling by staff and prefects of school site, especially toilets, lunch queues and secluded areas, and their presence at the school gates at the beginning and end of the day

Ways of breaking down age-groups, for example through ‘buddy’ systems, mixed age tutor groups, and out-of-school clubs run by older students for younger ones

Monitor all e-communications used on the school site or as part of school activities

Internet blocking technologies are continually updated and harmful sites blocked

Clear policies about the use of mobile phones at school and at other times when students are under the school’s authority

Victim Support

Independent listeners and peer mentoring schemes including older students and adults other than school staff, to whom victims of bullying may turn

Referral for emotional and therapeutic support from specialist children and adolescent mental health services and the voluntary sector where appropriate

Safe play areas or quiet rooms for younger students or those who feel threatened at break times

The involvement of students in procedures dealing with instances of bullying through ‘circles of friends’, peer mediation and other schemes

Providing feedback to the victim and family about what action will be taken in respect of the bully

Challenging Bullying

Prompt and thorough investigation of reported incidents, including contact with parents of victims and bullies in order to agree, if possible, a course of action

Use of Acceptable Behaviour Contracts with children who have bullied other children

Provision for follow-up with victims of bullying and bullies themselves

Consider the needs of the bully as well as the victim and take action to address those needs. This may include support and emotional/therapeutic interventions from other agencies

A system to record incidents of bullying so that analysis of patterns, whether of students involved, type of bullying, location or time, can inform policy and practice

 

Objectives and Policy development

 

  • All people in our community should have an understanding of what bullying is and know that bullying issues are taken seriously.
  • All people in our community should know what our policy is and follow it when bullying is being reported.
  • All people in our community should know that bullying will not be tolerated and should be prepared to report or challenge unacceptable comments and behaviour.
  • All people who work with children and young people should receive appropriate training to meet their identified needs to enable them to apply their anti-bullying policy responsibly.
  • All people who work with children and young people should be aware that effective supervision, particularly in potential trouble spots, can help to safeguard young people significantly.
  • All people should have the chance to participate in the development, application, monitoring and review of anti-bullying policies, which may affect them.
  • The production of a policy is only one element of an overall strategy.

 

Monitoring the Policy

 

A monitoring system enables a school or other establishment to follow up and record progress, and to ascertain the effectiveness of the policy.

 

The key messages in the policy need to be accessible to all members of the school or establishment and the community. Following consultation and ratification, it must be communicated and put into action.

 

Review/Evaluation

 

In order to be sure that your policy is making a difference, you will need to consider how you will set about measuring the impact of your policy. The following are some simple indicators of change. Some are more directly related to bullying than others.

 

  • Reduction in the levels and duration of reported bullying incidents.
  • Increased willingness to “tell” about bullying by bullied pupils, their parents or bystanders.
  • Improved attendance, at school and at another provision.
  • Enhanced achievement, involvement.
  • More parents opting to send their child to your school, or provision.
  • Improved performance in school and local authority surveys relating to bullying.

 

This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. There may be a range of other measures that children and young people, staff or parents may suggest.

 

Bullying is not just something that happens to children and young people; anyone, young or old, can be involved in bullying and should know that all can access support.

 

Dealing with complaints from parents regarding bullying/harassment incidents

 

  • It is a statutory requirement that schools should have an Anti-Bullying Policy. This can sometimes be part of their Behaviour Policy. Parents can request a copy of the Anti-Bullying Policy at any time. 

 

  • The Anti-Bullying Policy should include: reference to how the school help to prevent bullying; how children can report if they or someone else is being bullied; and how the school will deal with complaints made about bullying, including sanctions for bullies and support for victims. Schools should record all incidents of bullying. 

 

  • If a parent is unhappy with the handling of a complaint they or their child make about bullying, they should address this verbally with the form teacher or anti-bullying officer (where applicable).

 

  • If the form teacher/anti-bullying officer does not provide a satisfactory response to a parent’s concerns, this should be escalated to the Head teacher, verbally at first and perhaps through requesting a meeting.

 

  • If this does not resolve the issue, the parent should make a complaint in writing to the Head teacher and document any response.

 

  • If the issue does not get resolved at this stage, a letter should be written to the Chair of the Governing Body who should respond in writing.  Parents can also request a copy of their child’s records.

 

  • If a parent does not feel that the school has dealt with the complaint appropriately, they can then contact the Local Authority (LA). However, the LA will expect that parents have already been through the process outlined above, and, if not, will refer the parent back to the school to make contact with the Head teacher. The LA will investigate how the school has dealt with the complaint and seek resolution if the parents remain dissatisfied. The contact officer within the LA is the Service Performance and Review Officer on 01744 67(1861).

 

 

 

  • Any officers handling a call about bullying from a member of the public should refer to the above information and advise the person accordingly. Details of the time, date, name of caller and child involved should be taken in case the parent calls back. 

 

N.B. If the bullying incident is racist, homophobic, disability-based, sexist or faith-related, schools should complete all the information as requested in this Guidance but also report it directly to the CYPS Performance Review Officer, on 01744 67(1861), in order for the LA to comply with its duties.

 

 

Appendix 1

Recording and Monitoring Bullying/Harassment Incidents

 

The following pages detail a range of forms, which can be used by the school to record and monitor bullying/harassment incidents. It is not mandatory to use all of these examples, except for form E.

These include:

 

  • Tackling bullying/harassment incidents flow chart.
  • Bullying/harassment request for support – Form A - These are forms that should be made freely available to pupils to empower them to self-report.
  • Bullying/harassment victim reporting form – Form B - To be completed by support staff and pupil.
  • Bullying/harassment witness reporting form – Form C - To be completed by either staff member or pupils who have witnessed the incident.
  • Bullying/harassment school incident recording form – Form D.
  • Bullying/harassment LA incident recording form Form E.
  • Bullying/harassment review sheet – Form F.
  • Bullying/harassment feedback sheet - Tell us what you think (child/young person form) – Form G.
  • Bullying/harassment feedback sheet - Tell us what you think (parent/carer form) – Form H.

 

 

(Bold – denotes a duty placed on education providers as set in the Equality Act 2010)

 

The following flow chart can be used alongside the forms contained in this section to ensure that all relevant details related to bullying incidents are adequately recorded and monitored. Schools should consider these forms and the flow chart below and integrate them into their existing practice.

 

 

Update FORM D re outcomes of follow-up.

Child/young person completes FORM G.

Parent/carer completes FORM H.

 

Maintain contact with victim to review progress on a regular basis.

Use FORM F as appropriate.

To be actioned within 2 days.

Agree action plan and intervention strategies, including timescales –

Continuation of FORM D.

 

To be actioned within 2 weeks or sooner, as appropriate.

Pupil completes a request for help.

FORM A

 

Initial investigation, with victim, by anti-bullying co-ordinator commences.

FORM D

Parents/carers informed.

To be actioned within 24 hours.

Review – over a 2-3 month period

Plan additional action if appropriate.

Update FORM D as appropriate.

 

Ensure that records are placed onto the child’s/young person’s file for future reference.

 

Pupil witness reports an incident.

 

 

Staff witness reports an incident.

 

 

Staff acknowledges pupil request & arranges meeting.

FORM A

 

Staff member completes FORM C.

Pupil & Support Staff complete FORM C.

Victim & Support Staff complete FORM B.

 

Complete FORM E and return to the Local Authority.

Save copy of FORM D onto school database/pupil file to monitor.

 

Send Form E to LA at end of each term or as incident occurs.

Text Box: To be actioned within 2 days.Text Box: To be actioned within 2 weeks or sooner, as appropriate.Text Box: To be actioned within 24 hours.Text Box: Send Form E to LA at end of each term or as incident occurs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Appendix 2

 

Form A – Bullying/Harassment - Request for Support

 

 

 

You have a right to be safe and happy at this school. If you are not, we want to hear about it. Just fill in this form and post it in the Worry Box in the school hall.

 

The teachers/support staff you have named will send you back the tear-off slip at the bottom of this form, telling you when and where you can meet them.

 

Name: ________________________________________

 

Form:  ________________________________________

 

Have you approached a peer helper? Yes/No

 

Which teacher/support staff do you wish to speak with?     

 

 

 

______________________________________________  

 

Staff reply slip

 

 

Dear _________________________________________

 

Thank you for your note. I would like to meet you at ___________ (time)

 

 

at _____________________________________ (place) to talk about it.

 

 

Yours __________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 3

Form B – Bullying/Harassment - Victim Reporting Form

 

Name: ____________________________

 

Please describe what happened, what you saw and heard and how it made you feel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When did it happen? Time: ___________ Date: ___________

 

 

 

Where did it happen?

 

 

 

Who was involved?

 

 

 

Do you think anyone else saw or heard it?

 

 

 

Has anything like this happened before?

 

 

 

If it has, were the same people involved?

 

 

 

Has anything like this happened before?

 

Do you think anyone else saw or heard it?

 

What do you want to happen now?

 

 

 

Is there someone in school you would feel comfortable to talk to and to be supported by?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Signed: _________________________    Dated: _____________________

 

 

Appendix 4

Form C – Bullying/Harassment - Witness Reporting Form

 

Name: _____________________________________

 

Please describe what happened, what you saw and heard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When did it happen? Time: ___________ Date: ___________

 

 

 

 

Where did it happen?

 

 

 

 

Who was involved?

 

 

 

 

Do you think anyone else saw or heard it?

 

 

 

 

Has anything like this happened before?

 

 

 

 

If it has, were the same people involved?

 

 

 

 

 

Signed: _________________________    Dated: _____________________

 

 

Appendix 5

Form D  – Bullying/Harassment - School Incident Recording Form

 

Name of School:

 

School Number:

 

Name of Victim(s):

 

 

Name of Perpetrator(s):

 

 

Date reported:

 

Date of Incident:

 

Reported to:

 

Reported by:

 

 

Victim Profile (tick as appropriate):

Child in Care                                          Traveller child                        

Child Protection Register                             Gifted/Talented                              

Learning disability                                    Young Carer                           

English as an additional language                      Involved with EWO Service              

                                               

Racial Origin (tick as appropriate):

White British                                         Asian Indian                          

White Irish                                           Asian Pakistani                        

Mixed White & Caribbean                            Asian Bangladeshi                     

Mixed White & Black                                 Chinese                       

Mixed White & Asian                                 Irish Traveller                        

Black African                                         Gypsy                                 

Black Caribbean                                       Other __________________________

Disability: _____________________________

Religion: ______________________________

Gender: _______________________________

 

Perpetrator Profile (tick as appropriate):

Child in Care                                          Traveller child                        

Child Protection Register                             Gifted/Talented                              

Learning disability                                    Young Carer                           

English as an additional language                      Involved with EWO Service              

                                       

Racial Origin (tick as appropriate):

White British                                         Asian Indian                          

White Irish                                           Asian Pakistani                        

Mixed White & Caribbean                            Asian Bangladeshi                     

Mixed White & Black                                 Chinese                       

Mixed White & Asian                                 Irish Traveller                        

Black African                                         Gypsy                                 

Black Caribbean                                       Other _____________________________

Disability: _____________________________

Religion: ______________________________

Gender: _______________________________

 

 

Details of incident (tick as appropriate):

 

Disability incident                            Homophobic incident                  

Racist incident                                Faith incident                         

Sexist incident                               Other _____________________________                       

 

 

Bullying behaviours involved (tick as appropriate):

 

Physical behaviour                             Spreading nasty rumours              

Threats                                      Text message bullying                 

Taking belongings                            Mobile phone calls                     

Extortion                                    Picture/video via mobiles              

Causing damage to property                  E-mail bullying                         

Name-calling                                 Websites/Social Networks           

Taunting                                     Chat-rooms                           

Verbal abuse                                 Graffiti                                       

Sending notes                                 Twitter                                                      �

 

 

Location of Incident (tick as appropriate):

 

Classroom                                                �              Dining environment                             �

On journeys to and from school               �              Home                                                  �

Playing fields                                            �              Occurred outside school                     �            

 

 

Frequency and duration of bullying behaviour (tick as appropriate):

 

 

Reported after the first incident                     Persisting throughout the term               

Two or three times                           Persisting for more than one term    

Several times                         

 

 

Details of action taken (tick as appropriate):

 

Checked for other known incidents involving the same pupils                         

Notified class teacher/form tutor                                                                  

Individual discussion with those involved                                              

Notified parent(s)/carer(s) or relevant contact person                                       

Group discussion with those involved                                                  

CAF or Pre-CAF raised                                                                

If Hate Crime, have Police been informed?                    Yes       �       No        �

 

Other (please provide details)

 

 

 

Details of support systems/actions agreed with child/young person, parents/carers:

 

 

 

Details of sanctions applied in line with school’s/setting’s behaviours policy:

 

 

 

Follow-up date set:

 

 

With whom:

 

 

Location:

 

 

Signed and checked by Head teacher or SMT Member

 

 

 

Outcomes to follow-up:

 

Has the bullying stopped?                             Yes       �       No        �

 

Details of further action to be taken if required:

 

Action:

 

 

By whom:

 

 

 

By when:

 

 

Further date to follow-up:

 

Was the targeted child/young person and his/her parents/carers satisfied with the outcome?

 

Yes       �          No        �

 

Further Comments:

 

 

 

Signed (member of staff dealing with issue)

 

 

 

Checked and signed by Head teacher or SMT Member

 

 

PLEASE NOTE

This recording form is provided as an example of best practice for the school to record and retain both statutory and non-statutory information as part of the management of Bullying, Hate Crime and Harassment incidents.

Appendix 6

Form E –  Bullying/Harassment - LA Incident Recording Form

In the event of an incident and to comply with the requirements on schools, as set out in the Education and Inspections Act 2006 Section 21(5), please complete and return to:

Healthy Schools Team, Achievement & Inclusion Division, Atlas House, Corporation Street,

St. Helens WA9 1LD

Name of School:

 

Date reported:

 

Date of Incident:

 

Gender of victim: Male/Female (please circle)

Gender of perpetrator: Male/Female (please circle)

 

Details of incident (tick as appropriate):

 

Disability incident                            Homophobic incident                 

Racist incident                               Faith incident                        

Sexist incident                                       Other _____________________________                                

(Bold – denotes a duty placed on education providers as set in the Equality Act 2010)

 

Bullying behaviours involved (tick as appropriate):

 

Physical behaviour                             Spreading nasty rumours              

Threats                                      Text message bullying                 

Taking belongings                            Mobile phone calls                     

Extortion                                    Picture/video via mobiles              

Causing damage to property                  E-mail bullying                         

Name-calling                                 Websites/Social Networks           

Taunting                                     Chat-rooms                           

Verbal abuse                                 Graffiti                                       

Sending notes                                    Twitter                                                      �

 

 

Location of Incident (tick as appropriate):

 

Classroom                                                �           Dining environment                                �

On journeys to and from school               �           Home                                                     �

Playing fields                                            �           Occurred outside school                        �           

 

 

Frequency and duration of bullying behaviour (tick as appropriate):

 

 

Reported after the first incident                     Persisting throughout the term              

Two or three times                           Persisting for more than one term   

Several times                         

 

 

Details of action taken (tick as appropriate):

 

Checked for other known incidents involving the same pupils                         

Notified class teacher/form tutor                                                                     

Individual discussion with those involved                                              

Notified parent(s)/carer(s) or relevant contact person                                       

Group discussion with those involved                                                  

CAF or Pre-CAF raised                                                                

If Hate Crime, have Police been informed?                    Yes       �       No        �

 

Other (please provide details)

 

The information supplied on this form will be processed in accordance with the requirements of the Data Protection Act 1998. At all times, it will be treated as confidential and used only for the purpose of assessing, managing and monitoring bullying-related incidents.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 7

Form F – Bullying/Harassment - Review Sheet

 

Date:

 

 

Name of Reporter:

 

 

Name of Child/Young Person involved:

 

 

People present:

 

 

 

 

 

How has the situation developed:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does the person who was targeted say they are feeling now?

Are they feeling safe and satisfied with the action taken?

If so, how has it helped?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the attitude/view of the person(s) involved in the bullying behaviour?

 

 

 

 

Appendix 8

Form G – Harassment/Bullying Feedback - Tell us what you think –

Child/Young Person Form

 

Name: ____________________________

 

We want to make sure our anti-bullying policy is working properly. It would help us if you let us know your views by answering the following questions. This will enable us to improve support to everyone in school.

 

1. Were you happy with the support provided?

 

Yes         No    

 

2. What did you find most helpful?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Was there anything you found unhelpful which we could improve?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Did you feel you were fairly treated?

 

Yes         No    

 

Thank you for your time

 

Signed (optional)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 9

Form H – Bullying/Harassment Feedback - Tell us what you think – Parent/Carer Form

 

 

Name: ____________________________

 

We want to make sure our anti-bullying policy is working properly. It would help us if you let us know your views by answering the following questions. This will enable us to improve support to everyone in school.

 

1. Were you happy with the support provided?

 

Yes         No    

 

2. What did you find most helpful?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Was there anything you found unhelpful which we could improve?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Did you feel you were fairly treated?

 

Yes         No    

 

Thank you for your time

 

Signed (optional)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Appendix 10

 

The Legal Context

 

Every Child Matters

The government published ‘Every Child Matters: Change for Children’, which sets out a framework of five outcomes under which services for children should be organised and evaluated. The five outcomes are:

  • Being healthy
  • Staying safe
  • Enjoying and achieving
  • Making a positive contribution
  • Achieving economic wellbeing

 

Dealing with bullying is significant in achieving aims in four of these five outcomes.

 

The Equality Act 2010

The Equality Bill received royal assent in April 2010. The Act aims to simplify, streamline and strengthen existing equality law. It will give individuals greater protection from unfair discrimination and it will set a new standard for public services to treat everyone, no matter what their background or personal circumstances, with dignity and respect. Part 6 of the Act covers schools and education providers.

 

One of the main changes within the Act is the duty to record and report not only racist bullying, but also all identity-based forms of bullying. The current guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission states:

 

“As a school, you have legal duties to your pupils in relation to bullying and you must ensure that you treat all bullying on the grounds of a protected characteristic with the same level of seriousness as any other form of bullying.”

 

The protected characteristics, applicable to schools, are:

  • Disability (including Carers)
  • Gender (including Gender reassignment)
  • Race
  • Religion or Belief
  • Sexual Orientation

 

The Codes of Practice and Non-Statutory Guidance regarding all aspects of the Equality Act 2010 came into force as of October 2010.

 

The Education & Inspections Act 2006

This Act extends the power of schools to combat bullying or offensive behaviours, not only in school but also at those times when the students are not in school. Schools, thus, have the power to regulate the conduct of students when they are not on school premises and not under the lawful control or charge of a member of staff “…to such an extent as is reasonable”.

 

Every school must have a behaviour policy, including disciplinary measures determined by the Head teacher in the light of principles set by the Governing Body.

 

The Head teacher has a legal duty to establish detailed measures (rules, rewards, sanctions and behaviour management strategies) on behaviour and discipline that form the school’s behaviour policy. It is suggested that the Anti-Bullying policy is incorporated into the Behaviour policy. The policy must include measures to be taken with a view to encouraging good behaviour and respect for others on the part of students and, in particular, preventing all forms of bullying among students.

 

 

Disability Discrimination Act 2005

Schools have a specific duty to ensure that children with a disability have access to education within an inclusive and safe environment. Section 49a of the Act outlines the general duty to have regard to:

  • the need to eliminate discrimination that is unlawful under the Act;
  • the need to eliminate harassment of disabled persons that is related to their disabilities;
  • the need to promote equality of opportunity between disabled persons and other persons;
  • the need to take steps to take account of disabled persons' disabilities, even where that involves treating disabled persons more favourably than other persons;
  • the need to promote positive attitudes towards disabled persons; and
  • the need to encourage participation by disabled persons in public life.

 

The Governing Body needs to ensure that the school has a disability equality scheme (or is included in a single equality scheme) and makes reasonable adjustments to avoid placing disabled students at a substantial disadvantage in comparison with students who are not disabled.

 

The Children Act 2004

The Children Act 2004 (Section 10) sets out a requirement for agencies to co-operate to improve the wellbeing of children. This states:

 

“Each children’s services authority must make arrangements to promote co-operation between the authority, each of its relevant partners and other persons or bodies as the authority considers appropriate.”

 

The Children Act 2004 introduced fundamental changes to the delivery of services for children through a range of organisational and cultural changes. It required the appointments in authorities of Children’s Directors, Lead Members for Children and Young People and the establishment of Children’s Trusts. These new structures are aimed at delivering improved support to children, parents and carers through early intervention; effective protection of children and improved accountability with the expectation that:

  • Professionals will work together in more integrated frontline services.
  • There will be common processes to underpin frontline working.
  • A common planning and commissioning framework will bring the planning of agencies closer together, supported by the pooling of resources.
  • There will be interagency governance arrangements with shared ownership and clear accountability.

 

Education Act 2002

Section 175 of the Education Act 2002 places a duty on the Governing Body of schools and on the Local Authority to:

  • Make arrangements to carry out their function to safeguard and promote the welfare of children through rigorously enforced strategies;
  • Take all reasonable measures to ensure that risks of harm to children’s welfare are minimised;
  • Take all appropriate action to address concerns about the welfare of a child, or children, working to agreed local policies and procedures in full partnership with other local agencies.

 

The Act states that safeguarding covers more than the contribution made to child protection in relation to individual children. It also encompasses issues such as pupil health, safety and bullying.

 

In relation to maintained schools, the duty is placed on Governing Bodies. A failure to have the required arrangements in place may be grounds for the Secretary of State to take action against an LA or Governing Body. Governing Bodies must produce an annual profile answering the question ‘How do we make sure our students are healthy, safe and well-supported?’

 

Also, Governing Bodies must establish procedures for dealing with complaints about bullying and all matters relating to the school, and publicise these procedures.

 

Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003

The Education elements of this Act came into force in February 2004. The Act has implications for working in partnership with parents and carers and, with regard to interventions, using contracts. It states: “The purpose of parent contracts is to address improved behaviour in school and any underlying causes”. An underlying cause may be related to bullying.

 

An Acceptable Behaviour Contract (also known as Acceptable Behaviour Agreement) may be used with a child who has been bullying. It is a written agreement made between a person who has been involved in anti-social behaviour and the local authority. It is an intervention designed to engage an individual in acknowledging his or her anti-social behaviour and its effect on others, with the aim of stopping that behaviour.

 

The Children’s Homes Regulations 2001

Under Section 11 of the Regulations, the registered person is required to promote the welfare of children and young people by making proper provision for the care, education, supervision and, where appropriate treatment of children accommodated there. The registered person must ensure that the home is conducted in a manner which respects the privacy and dignity of children accommodated there; and with due regard to their gender, religious persuasion, racial origin, cultural and linguistic background and any disability.

 

Although not specifically mentioned, promoting anti-bullying practice and dealing with bullying will be included in this requirement to promote the welfare of the looked after children accommodated there.

 

The Local Government Act 2000

Section 104 of the Local Government Act 2000 amended Section 28 of the Local

Government Act 1988 by adding: “nothing …shall be taken to prevent the Head teacher or Governing Body of a maintained school, or a teacher employed by a maintained school, from taking steps to prevent any form of bullying”.

 

Race Relations Amendment Act 2000 and Guidance from the Equality & Human Rights Commission

Statutory organisations, including schools, must:

  • Have a published race equality policy (or be included in a single equality scheme); and
  • Monitor and assess the impact of their policies, including their race equality policy, on people of different ethnic minority groups;
  • Ensure that policies do not discriminate against ethnic minority groups.

 

In addition to these specific requirements, schools’/children’s settings are under a statutory duty to work toward the elimination of racial discrimination and to promote good race relations. If a school/children’s setting fails to address bullying of a racial nature, this will be contrary to the requirements to promote race equality and good relations between different ethnic groups. Where a child suffers racial bullying, the school/children’s setting should take it very seriously and not regard it as “normal” bullying. Any failure on the part of the school/children’s setting to deal with bullying which involves a racial element could be a potential breach of the Race Relations Amendment Act 2000.

 

School Standards Framework Act 1998

Under Section 61 of the School Standards Framework Act 1998, Head teachers are required to:

  • ‘Determine measures…. with a view to... encouraging good behaviour and respect for others on the part of students and, in particular, these measures should aim to prevent all forms of bullying and racial harassment’.
  • The measures must be published in writing to all parents, students and staff at school at least once a year, i.e. the school should draft and publish an anti-bullying policy.

 

Some schools have chosen to draft a written anti-bullying policy as a part of their behaviour/discipline policy. If this is done, it must be clear which sanctions apply to bullying. For the purposes of clarity, it is better to have a policy that is separate to the behaviour/discipline policy, but which cross-refers to the behaviour/discipline policy if necessary. Under the 1998 Framework, schools are also required to record all incidents of bullying and report them to the school Governing Body.

 

Human Rights Act 1998

The Human Rights Act gives further weight to the rights and freedoms guaranteed under the European Convention on Human Rights and incorporates the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) 1989. Children should be involved in drafting the school policy, monitoring its use and evaluating its effectiveness. Involving children in this way is compatible with the children and young people’s right to participate under Article 12 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child 1989.

Bullying is a children’s rights issue, and children’s rights approaches have a significant role to play in tackling the problem of bullying behaviour.

 

Health & Safety at Work Act 1974

The Act places a duty on employers to ensure the health, safety and welfare of those using their premises. This includes children and young people, parents and visitors.

The same legislation also requires the employer to provide a safe place of work for employees and others using the establishment.

 

Appendix 11

Useful Contacts

Websites

http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/wholeschool/behaviour/tacklingbullying

 

To view the new Department for Education website, please go to

 

http://www.education.gov.uk

All statutory guidance and legislation published on this site continues to reflect the current legal position unless indicated otherwise.

 

Safe to Learn: Embedding anti-bullying work in schools is the overarching anti-bullying guidance for schools and was launched in September 2007. It can be ordered from TeacherNet's online publications site. The Safe to Learn package of guidance also includes specialist advice on cyberbullying, homophobic bullying and bullying involving children with SEN and disabilities. This is in addition to the existing guidance on tackling bullying related to race, religion and culture that was issued in 2006.

The document Guidance for schools on preventing and responding to sexist, sexual and transphobic bullying was published 10 December 2009, forming part of the Safe to Learn suite.

In April 2008, the DCSF issued the DVD and resource pack Let's fight it together for school staff working with pupils in assembly and classroom situations.

http://www.antibullyingalliance.org.uk

 

 

Anti-Bullying Alliance – (ABA)

A unique collection of over 60 organisations, working together to stop bullying. ABA runs an ‘anti-bullying week’ focusing on schools, in mid-November each year. Full details on this website.

http://www.thinkuknow.co.uk

Thinkuknow is the website of the Child Exploitation and Online Protection (CEOP) Centre

5 sections 5-7 years, 8-10 years, 11-16 years, Parents & Carers, Teachers & Trainers.

Great resources

http://www.beatbullying.org

 

 

 

 

 

Beatbullying – Including ‘CyberMentors’ & ‘MiniMentors’

Beatbullying works with children and young people across the UK to provide them with all-important opportunities to make positive and lasting changes to their lives and outlook.

Lesson plans for teachers

http://www.nspcc.org.uk

 

 

http://www.childline.org.uk

NSPCC/CHIPS/CHILDLINE

CHIPS – National peer mentoring programme.

News, Help & Advice, Training, Publications & Classroom Resources, Events

PLAY – Games, watch videos

EXPLORE – Bullying inside & outside of school, racism, online safety etc.

TALK – message boards, online chat-room, receive advice via text

http://www.kidscape.org.uk

 

 

Kidscape – Preventing Bullying, Protecting Children

Advice for parents (including AB helpline)

Advice also for professionals, children and young people, including resources to order and free downloadable information.

http://www.stonewall.org.uk

 

 

Stonewall

Lesbian, gay & bi-sexual charity.

Lots of free resources available for dealing with homophobic bullying.

http://www.clickcleverclicksafe.com

 

 

UKCCIS – UK Council for Child Internet Safety

Over 140 organisations and individuals working together to help children and young people stay safe on the internet.

http://www.childnet-int.org

 

Childnet International’s mission is to work in partnership with others around the world to help make the Internet a great and safe place for children.

http://www.antibullying.net

 

 

Anti-Bullying Network

The Anti-Bullying Network was established at the University of Edinburgh in 1999 and gained a reputation for the high quality of the services it provided to school communities.

http://www.bullying.co.uk

 

Bullying Online

This website is aimed at adults working with children under 11 years and for the children themselves.

http://www.therelationshipscentre.co.uk/talkdontwalk

 

Talk, Don’t Walk

A service for young people who may run away.

This is a local, specialist service offering a range of information and advice, emotional and outreach support services, family mediation and innovative training and resources to support everyone to develop healthier relationships.

 

 

Helpful Organisations

 

  • Advisory Centre for Education (ACE)                               020 7354 8321
  • Children’s Legal Centre                                                  0845 345 4345
  • Kidscape Parent’s Helpline (Monday - Friday, 10 - 4)           0845 1205 204
  • Parentline Plus                                                              0808 800 2222
  • Youth Access                                                               020 8772 9900
  • Talk, Don’t Walk                                                           0800 085 2136
  • Childline                                                                      0800 1111
  • GLYSS                                                                        07747 473 829
 

Appendix 12

St. Helens Council  Hate Crime Reporting Form          

 

St. Helens Council Hate Crime reporting form to be inserted here.

Hate incidents are any incidents that are regarded as such by the victim or anyone else.

 

Important, please note: If the complainant is unable to speak sufficient English to complete the form and to understand the implications of providing their consent below, then you must seek the services of an interpreter before continuing.

 

ABOUT THE INCIDENT

Are you a victim or a witness? (Please tick)

Victim

 

Witness

 

Third Party

 

What do you think motivated the incident? (Please tick)

Racism

 

Disability / Disablism

 

Homophobia

 

Gender / Transphobia

 

Ageism

 

Religion / Faith / Bigotry

 

Other, please specify

 

Tell us about the incident in your own words, giving as much detail as possible (use back of the sheet if necessary)

 

When did the incident take place?

Time

 

Day

 

Date

 

Where did this happen? (Location / Street / Town / City)

 

Were there any injuries? If yes, please give details

 

Did any loss or damage to property result?

 

ABOUT THE VICTIM (if known)

Age

 

Religion

 

Gender

 

Sexuality

 

Disability (please tick any that apply)

Racial Origin (please tick one from below)

White British

 

Asian Indian

 

White Irish

 

Asian Pakistani

 

Mixed White & Caribbean

 

Asian Bangladeshi

 

Mixed White & Black

 

Chinese

 

Mixed White & Asian

 

Gypsy / Roma

 

Black African

 

Irish Traveller

 

Black Caribbean

 

Not Stated

 

Any other please specify

 

           

 

ABOUT THE OFFENDERS

How many offenders were there?

 

Please describe of the offenders?  (Names, ages, gender, height, ethnicity, build, clothing, distinguishing marks, etc.)

 

If a vehicle was used, please describe it.  (E.g. make, model, registration, colour, distinguishing marks, etc)

 

Date that the form was completed

 

 

COMPLAINANT PERSONAL DETAILS

The details you have provided to us so far will be recorded for monitoring purposes.  Personal information is recorded in line with the Data Protection Act and only used to respond to hate crime.

Name

 

Tel no

 

Address

Do you wish to share your personal details with Merseyside Police?

 

     

Please tell us how you would prefer to be contacted e.g. only at certain times or locations, only by email etc

 

Please sign the form.

 

Complainant’s Signature

 

REPORTING OFFICER

Agency

 

Name

 

Position

 

Tel no

 

Date

 

 

Staff Signature

 

FOLLOW UP REPORT (for official use only)

 

All completed forms should be and sent to the Safer and Stronger Communities Manager, Beacon Building, College Street, St.Helens, WA10 1TS (marked “confidential”)

Email contactcentre@sthelens.gov.uk

Contact the School

Rainford C E Primary School

Cross Pit Lane
Rainford
St Helens
WA11 8AJ

Main Contact: Jayne Owens (Office)

Tel: 01744 883281
Fax: 01744 886495
rainfordp@sthelens.org.uk